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9 Summary of Impacts - Proposed Action, Routine Operations: Social Systems

Economic Impacts

North Slope oil production would make a substantial, though declining (14% by 2020), contribution to domestic oil production and would continue to reduce the need for foreign oil imports, thus improving national energy security and the overall balance of trade. Significant federal tax revenues would be generated with continued TAPS operations, together with marine and shipbuilding employment and employment in the economy as a whole. Gross state product, population, employment, personal income, and tax revenues would experience slow to moderate growth, though North Slope oil production and resultant employment and revenues would decline.

Subsistence and Sociocultural Impacts

TAPS renewal for 30 years would have small impacts on subsistence. The proposed action would contribute to continued change in Alaska Native and rural non-Native sociocultural systems that likely would be small.

Impacts on Land Use and Coastal Zone Management

Under the proposed action, there could be some access and use conflicts with private land holders, temporary noise impacts on recreationists from TAPS construction work, and impacts from spills (of varying degrees, depending on volume, timing, duration, and location) on other users of the area along the TAPS. There would be no conflict with coastal management programs (CMPs).

For More Information

More information about the impacts to the social systems from routine operations under the proposed action is available in the FEIS Volume 3, Section 4.1 - 4.6, Proposed Action Alternative Analysis - Routine Operations.

PDF icon Sections 4.0 - 4.2 (828 KB, 74 pgs.)
PDF icon Section 4.3 (703 KB, 106 pgs.)
PDF icon Section 4.4 (967 KB, 146 pgs.)
PDF icon Sections 4.5 - 4.6 (781 KB, 108 pgs.)

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